No one speaks English, and everything’s broken


As men are generally more short-term oriented in their sexuality than women, and given that cigarette and alcohol use are still considered masculine behaviors, we explored if female smoking and drinking can function as a short-term mating strategy. […]

The experiment showed that young men perceive women who use cigarettes and alcohol as being more sexually unrestricted. Furthermore, tobacco and (especially) alcohol use brought some short-term attractiveness benefits to women. In short-term mating contexts, drinking enhanced women’s attractiveness, whereas occasional smoking was found equally desirable as not smoking. However, in long-term mating contexts, frequent drinking and all smoking behavior harmed women’s desirability.

{ Evolutionary Psychology | Continue reading }

art { Edvard Munch, Girls on the Bridge, 1902 }

Your air in my lungs

24.jpg

People are often the most aggressive against the people to whom they are closest—intimate partners. Intimate partner violence might be partly a result of poor self-control. Self-control of aggressive impulses requires energy, and much of this energy is provided by glucose derived from the food we eat. We measured glucose levels in 107 married couples over 21 days. To measure aggressive impulses, participants stuck 0–51 pins into a voodoo doll that represented their spouse each night, depending how angry they were with their spouse. To measure aggression, participants blasted their spouse with loud noise through headphones. Participants who had lower glucose levels stuck more pins into the voodoo doll and blasted their spouse with louder and longer noise blasts.

{ PNAS | PDF }

art { Sergei Eisenstein. Untitled, c. 1931 }

‘When people are free to do as they please, they usually imitate each other.’ –Eric Hoffer

3.jpg

The ability to choose should let people create more enjoyable experiences. However, in a set of 5 studies, people who chose repeatedly during ongoing consumption exhibited a greater drop in enjoyment compared with those who received a series of random selections from the same set of liked stimuli.

{ American Psychology Association | Continue reading }

related { This questionnaire was designed to test your ability to choose at random }

Every day, the same, again

23.jpgWorld’s largest hedge fund to replace managers with artificial intelligence

“Smart restaurant” in Beijing employs facial recognition to make recommendations about what customers might order, based on factors like their age, gender and facial expression

All signs point to a corporate takeover of the marijuana industry by Bayer, Monsanto

One 2007 study found that when participants drank vodka mixed with soda, their blood alcohol levels were higher than those who drank straight vodka

3 Studies Refute Idea that Exposure to Sexy Centerfolds Harms Men’s Relationships

Impact of holding umbrella on uni- and bi-directional pedestrian flow

Living close to heavy traffic was associated with a higher incidence of dementia

Physicist sentenced to 18 months in prison for faking data.

What Happens to Rejected Papers?

The sign, erected in 1923 as an advertisement for a housing development, originally read “Hollywoodland.” On New Year’s Day of 1976, the sign became “HOLLYWeeD” for the first time.

Walk like a penguin to avoid slipping on ice, German doctors advise

The Pot/Lid Illusion

A Selection of the 30 Most Disappointing Under 30

When that hark from the air said it was Captain Finsen

22.jpg

The travel booking systems used by millions of people every day are woefully insecure and lack modern authentication methods. This allows attackers to easily modify other people’s reservations, cancel their flights and even use the refunds to book tickets for themselves.

{ Computer World | Continue reading }

related { By posting a picture of your boarding pass online, you may be giving away more information than you think }

‘Everything has already been said, but since nobody was listening, we have to start again.’ –André Gide

2.jpg

The most difficult part about looking at the future is unlearning what we know. There is so much baked into our generally held assumptions that tend to blind us — all of us.

{ Interview with Kevin Kelly | Continue reading }

‘Become such as you are, having learned what that is.’ –Pindar

21.jpg

We use data from the 2002–2013 National Surveys of Family Growth to examine change across U.S. cohorts born between 1966 and 1995 in whether individuals have had sex with same-sex partners only, or with both men and women, and in whether they have a bisexual or gay identity. Adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, and mother’s education, we find increases across cohorts in the proportion of women who report a bisexual identity, who report ever having had sex with both sexes, or who report having had sex with women only. By contrast, we find no cohort trend for men; roughly 5 percent of men in every cohort have ever had sex with a man, and the proportion claiming a gay or bisexual attraction changed little. We speculate that this gender difference is rooted in a broader pattern of asymmetry in gender change in which departures from traditional gender norms are more acceptable for women than men.

{ Sociological Science | PDF }

photo { Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin }

Everyday, the same, again

241.jpgMobsters ran a fake U.S. Embassy in Ghana for 10 years, flying the flag and issuing visas for $6,000

Ransomware offers decryption keys if you infect two other people

Uber employees have access to customer trip information, and they’re using it to spy on ex-girlfriends and celebrities

Since the mid-1990s, it’s estimated that at least 100,000 Japanese men and women vanish annually

Encounters with ‘familiar strangers’ play overlooked role in human interactions

Our results indicate that sisters might be particularly tuned to select suitable perfumes for their siblings.

Facial and vocal attractiveness were found to positively correlate in women but not in men

In the present work, we investigate the pop cultural idea that people have a sixth sense, called “gaydar,” to detect who is gay.

Psychiatrists Must Face Possibility That Medications Hurt More Than They Help

Does One Armpit Smell Like the Other? [More: Improbable podcast]

The Heroin Overdose Mystery [PDF]

Most Americans like their choices in today’s information-saturated world, but 20% feel overloaded

The military mobilization that followed came to be known as the Crusades [PDF]

California man spent $1 million playing Game of War

Student Lets Thief Steal His Phone, Spies On Him For Weeks To Make This Documentary [Thanks Tim]

‘The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.’ –Dostoyevsky

3.jpg

When you’re doing two things at once – like listening to the radio while driving – your brain organizes itself into two, functionally independent networks, almost as if you temporarily have two brains. That’s according to a fascinating new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientists Shuntaro Sasai and colleagues.

{ Neuroskeptic | Continue reading }

art { Harri Peccinotti }

yesterday never comes back

22.jpg

Remembering the past is a complex phenomenon that is subject to error. The malleable nature of human memory has led some researchers to argue that our memory systems are not oriented towards flawlessly preserving our past experiences. Indeed, many researchers now agree that remembering is, to some degree, reconstructive. Current theories propose that our capacity to flexibly recombine remembered information from multiple sources – such as distributed memory records, inferences, and expectations – helps us to solve current problems and anticipate future events. One implication of having a reconstructive and flexible memory system is that people can develop rich and coherent autobiographical memories of entire events that never happened.

In this article, we revisit questions about the conditions under which participants in studies of false autobiographical memory come to believe in and remember fictitious childhood experiences. […]

Approximately one-third of participants showed evidence of a false memory, and more than half showed evidence of believing that the [fictitious] event occurred in the past.

{ Memory | Continue reading }

Photo photo { Brooke Nipar }

Mimosa Multimetica

23.jpg

{ Yves Klein, Monochrome jaune sans titre (M 8), 1957 | Roy Lichtenstein, Yellow brushstroke I, 1965 }

Every day, the same, again

21.jpg Nearly 40% of Americans Would Give Up Sex for a Year in Exchange for Better Online Security

Criminals can guess Visa card number and security code in just six seconds, experts find

Paper money and coins as potential vectors of transmissible disease [PDF]

The world’s magicians fought a hidden war over an ultra-secret website dedicated to stealing magic tricks

Uber Now Tracks Passengers’ Locations Even After They’re Dropped Off

At this very moment, dozens of Uber’s self-driving cars are touring San Francisco, Phoenix, and Pittsburgh

As transportation industry expert Hubert Horan will demonstrate in his four-part series, Uber has greatly oversold its case [part 1 part 2, part 3, part 4]

When judging other people, first impressions last

Why it’s hard to talk and make eye contact at the same time

Depression in Young People Affects the Stomach, Anxiety the Skin

Portions of the brain fall asleep and wake back up all the time, Stanford researchers find

The purpose of this article is to clarify the distinction between the dying and sick roles

Eleven of the world’s 55 dictators are 69 years old or older and are in varying stages of declining health. At first blush, this paints a hopeful picture for democracy scholars who have documented a slow but steady authoritarian resurgence. Yet…

The findings confirmed that frequent laundering reduced mass, increased colour loss, and reduced tensile strength in the warp direction of the fabric.

A proposed theory of gravity does away with dark matter

In some areas, 98 per cent of female elephants now have no tusks, researchers have said, compared to between two and six percent born tuskless on average in the past.

Perspective Distortion in World War I Camouflage

Background notes and full credits for “The One Moment” Video by OK Go.