Every day, the same, again

32.jpgFrench organic winegrower fined for refusing to spray grapes with pesticide

French scientists are working on an acoustic earthquake shield

A fugitive managed to become the finance chief of a Czech Museum, subsequently stole $500,000.

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

Regenerative medicine: For the first time, a mammalian organ has been persuaded to renew itself

Caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer’s disease

Tendency to procrastinate is affected by genetic factors, which are also linked to a propensity to be impulsive

Online skim reading is taking over the human brain

The ‘fading affect bias’ (FAB), the tendency for negative emotions to fade away more quickly than positive ones in our memories.

Research suggests that the way people think and act is affected by ceiling height.

If the Universe began with equal amount of matter and antimatter, why does matter dominate today’s cosmos?

Dark Matter May Be Destroying Itself in Milky Way’s Core

GPS Shoes Will Lead You Home, Just Click Your Heels Three Times [Thanks Tim]

Five Reasons Not To Raise Venture Capital

Smart cars targeted for ‘tipping’ in San Francisco

Twitter’s strategy to fix itself is to become more and more like Facebook

Damien Hirst’s ghostwritten biography promises to reveal criminal past and to expose the “filthy money business” of the art world. Plus: Florida Pastor on Trial for Selling Fake Damien Hirst Paintings

TIFF’s first major original exhibition: David Cronenberg: Evolution

Tobias Frere-Jones on type foundries in New York, 1828-1909

Barbarian Group’s Superdesk and Barton F. Graf’s continuous floor [Thanks Tim]

The SHREKTACULAR Swamp

Lot’s Wife Found on Mars

leaked picture from that space ship that crashed into the sun

We must embrace emptiness and burn it as fuel for our journey

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If you’re like most people, you spend a great deal of your time remembering past events and planning or imagining events that may happen in the future. While these activities have their uses, they also make it terribly hard to keep track of what you have and haven’t actually seen, heard, or done. Distinguishing between memories of real experiences and memories of imagined or dreamt experiences is called reality monitoring and it’s something we do (or struggle to do) all of the time. […]

Perhaps you’ve left the house and headed to work, only to wonder en route if you’d locked the door. Even if you thought you did, it can be hard to tell whether you remember actually doing it or just thinking about doing it. […]

The study’s authors also found greater activation in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex when they compared reality monitoring for actions participants performed with those they only imagined performing.

{ Garden of the Mind | Continue reading }

‘The fire of hell is called eternal, only because it never ends.’ –Thomas Aquinas

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When you really focus your attention on something, you’re said to be “in the present moment.” But a new piece of research suggests that the “present moment” is actually […] a sort of composite—a product mostly of what we’re seeing now, but also influenced by what we’ve been seeing for the previous 15 seconds or so. They call this ephemeral boundary the “continuity field.”

{ Quartz | Continue reading }

photo { Richard Sandler }

Every day, the same, again

354.jpgNine-month-old boy accused of planning murder

China’s corporate debt has hit record levels

Growing up poor is bad for your DNA

A team of researcher have identified a new way of treating cancer.

While antibiotics have saved countless lives, they’re an assault on our microbiome.

Results suggest that a perceiver can accurately gauge the real intelligence of men, but not women, by viewing their faces in photographs More: Want people to think you’re smarter? Smile more.

Which couples who meet on social networking sites are most likely to marry?

Women do not apply to ‘male-sounding’ job postings

Reasoning is generally seen as a means to improve knowledge and make better decisions. However, much evidence shows that reasoning often leads to epistemic distortions and poor decisions. [PDF]

There are clear differences between how our brains respond to genuine and fake laughter

Does the unconscious know when you’re being lied to?

Levels of psychopathic traits among Mafia members who have been convicted of a criminal offense

The Empathetic Capacity of Psychopaths and its Neurological Implications

Selfies Linked to Narcissism, Addiction and Mental Illness, Say Scientists [Thanks Tim]

How does stress affect your public speaking skills?

‘Homo’ is the only primate whose tooth size decreases as its brain size increases

The idea that flies don’t like stripes dates back at least to 1930.

Study shows restaurant reviews written on rainy or snowy days, or very cold or hot days, are more negative than those written on nice days.

You Can Now Search Yelp Using Emojis

The inexplicable prices in hotel minibars around the world

Six humans are in Hawaii, testing the psychological effects of life on another planet.

Could Noah’s Ark Float? In Theory, Yes Previously: The Impossible Voyage of Noah’s Ark

How Many People Does It Take to Colonize Another Star System?

Norwegian Skydiver Almost Gets Hit by Falling Meteor — and Captures it on Film

234.jpgHacker holds key to free flights

The “Cuban Twitter” Scam

Researchers have created a wearable device that is as thin as a temporary tattoo and can store and transmit data about a person’s movements, receive diagnostic information and release drugs into skin. [more]

Gawker bans ‘Internet slang’

Why I keep a database of my friends and colleagues and rates their personal, professional, physical and financial attributes.

The Steve Jobs email that outlined Apple’s strategy a year before his death

Is This the Modern Woman’s Perfect Bikini Wax?

New Kurt Cobain death scene photos released by Seattle P.D.

Crap Taxidermy [Thanks Tim]

The Golden Boba

Safely Immobilize Children

The bags under my eyes right now are reaaaal

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{ Why the Trix Rabbit Looks Down on You | FiveThirtyEight | full story }

‘Instead of committing suicide, people go to work.’ –Thomas Bernhard

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Ketamine, a chemical used as an anaesthetic for horses and as an illegal party drug, can produce “remarkable changes” in severely depressed patients who are not helped by existing treatments, according to a new study.

Oxford university researchers reported encouraging results from a clinical trial in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. Some patients who had been severely depressed for years, despite multiple antidepressants and talking therapies, responded rapidly to intravenous infusions of ketamine.

[…]

The Oxford team has given more than 400 ketamine infusions to 45 patients and is now looking for ways to sustain the initial benefits, which faded in most of the patients.

Although ketamine is a banned substance – and about to be upgraded by the Home Office from Class C to Class B – the Oxford patients did not show the ill effects, such as bladder problems and memory loss, which make it a dangerous drug of abuse.

The doses used to treat depression are much lower than some people take illegally. Even so, most patients experienced a shortlived “dissociative” effect, with feelings that they were disconnecting from their body, as the drug was being infused. It did not produce euphoric feelings.

{ FT | Continue reading }

What’s the last thing that you do remember?

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A fascinating paper asks what one man with no memory – and no regrets – can really teach us about time. […]

Researchers Carl Craver and colleagues describe the case of “KC”, a former “roadie for rock bands, prone to drinking and occasional rash behavior” who suffered extensive brain damage in a motorcycle crash. In particular, KC lost his hippocampus on both sides of the brain. This area is crucial for memory, so KC experiences profound amnesia. In fact, he’s one of the best known cases of the condition.

KC is unable to form any new long-term memories: he forgets everything that happens within a matter of minutes. He also, famously, cannot imagine anything happening in either the past or the future. Here’s a much-quoted conversation between him and neuroscientist Endel Tulving.

ET: What will you be doing tomorrow?

[15 second pause.]

KC: I don’t know.


{ Neuroskeptic | Continue reading }

photo { Archana Rayamajhi }

Every day, the same, again

452.jpeg Danish travel company offers “ovulation discount” for couples, rewards if you conceive on holiday

$4 trillion in “fake” euro bonds seized at Vatican Bank

Feelings of gratitude automatically reduce financial impatience

Daylight saving time linked to heart attacks, study

How behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief, study

Autism ‘begins long before birth’

How Scammers Turn Google Maps Into Fantasy Land

In a behavior called whitewalling, users post to Facebook—sometimes in great detail — but then quickly delete everything, creating a blank timeline.

Fake Guggenheim Website Announces Sustainable Design Competition for Abu Dhabi Branch

Whose idea was it to put the * and the # on the telephone? The story behind the symbol.

Saving $400M printing cost from font change? Not exactly…

Google Trends data showed a 193% spike in searches for “cancel Amazon prime,” less than the 433% spike observed in searches for “cancel Netflix” in 2011

What Your Accountant Thinks About Your Bitcoins

What It’s Like to Be a Professional Line Sitter

Radiolab: If you could wipe mosquitoes off the face of the planet, would you?

Why do snakes have two penises?

Why light inspires ritual

Black death was not spread by rat fleas, say researchers

By happy, horrified tradition, theater folk hesitate to name a certain Shakespeare play (Macbeth), for fear bad things will then happen.

Penguin Group Targets Artist Over Satirical Art Book

Nietzsche was writing out his own prescriptions for the sedative chloral hydrate, signing them “Dr. Nietzsche.”

Interview with Michel Foucault, 1971 [via SFJ]

Are two interviewers better than one?

Boost your vocabulary with these fiercely plausible words and definitions

Designer Beaver [I Got Vajazzled by Completely Bare Hi-Tech Spa in NYC]

Every day, the same, again

345.jpgWal-Mart sues Visa for $5 billion over card swipe fees

Gangs of ‘powerfully built’ black women are mugging tourists on the streets of Hong Kong. One luckless expatriate was picked up and thrown into a trash can.

Cell phone use is estimated to be involved in 26 percent of all motor vehicle crashes

Four in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments

Public smoking bans linked with rapid fall in preterm births and child hospital visits for asthma

Marinating meat in beer before grilling it can reduce the chances of producing harmful chemicals that can cause cancer

According to a new study, a couple of drinks makes you tell objectively funnier jokes. [Thanks Tim]

Scientists Create Synthetic Yeast Chromosome Man-made yeasts could irreversibly change everything from the biofuel to the brewing industry.

Farrenkopf had a bank account with a very large sum in it, and she had set up her mortgage and utility bills to be paid automatically from it. As her body decomposed in her garage, the funds went out regularly.

In 1982 a brutal triple homicide shook the city of Waco and soon became one of the most confounding criminal cases in Texas history [Part I to V]

Sweden is the largest exporter of pop music, per capita, in the world.

Censorship is free speech when search engines do it, a US court just ruled

I like doing sound portraits – I get close to someone’s face, I take down the sound of the hair, the sounds of the skin, eyes and lips, and then I create a specific chord that relates to the face. How Harbisson hears the colors that most people see

3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted In Woman

Five Health Benefits of Standing Desks

Grills, ‘Grillz’ and dental hygiene implications

I’ve put my heartbeat on the internet.

The Jewish-Japanese Sex & Cook Book and How to Raise Wolves

Embroidered Cat Shirts By Hiroko Kubota [Thanks Tim]

His animals get their energy from the wind so they don’t have to eat. [Wikipedia]

Instant architect

Two former models who are now special agents are on the trail of mobsters in possession of a music book that has the coded location of a chest of gold bullion

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Giving violators more punishment than they deserve can undermine the benefits of cooperative action. […] At the same time, imposing markedly less punishment than what a violator deserves creates disaffection and acrimony that also can subvert cooperation. In other words, it is not punishment that is needed to maintain social cooperation, but justice. […]

In 1848, the discovery of gold brought 300,000 men to California from all over the world. Yet this sudden mass of humanity lived without a functioning legal system. And if there had been a legal enforcement system, it was unclear what law it would enforce. […] Without a functional government, there were no licensing procedures, fees, or taxes to regulate gold prospecting. No miner worked land that he owned. Any prospector could join any mining camp at any time. Camp populations were heterogeneous: “Puritans and drunkards, clergymen and convict, honest and dishonest, rich and poor.” There was no common language, culture, or legal experience. […] The men shared a common set of needs, however. Each miner needed to be able to leave whatever he owned unguarded each day while he worked his claim. A miner who found gold needed to protect his find until he could convert it into cash or goods.

{ Paul H. Robinson/SSRN | Continue reading }

‘Never confuse the size of your paycheck with the size of your talent.’ —Marlon Brando

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People often believe they have more control over outcomes (particularly positive outcomes) than they actually do. Psychologists discovered this illusion of control in controlled experiments. […] People suffering from depression tend not to fall for this illusion. That fact, along with similar findings from depression, gave rise to the term depressive realism. Two recent studies now suggest that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may also represent contingency and estimate personal control differently from the norm. […] Their obsessions cause them distress and they perform compulsions in an effort to regain some sense of control over their thoughts, fears, and anxieties. Yet in some cases, compulsions (like sports fans’ superstitions) seem to indicate an inflated sense of personal control. Based on this conventional model of OCD, you might predict that people with the illness will either underestimate or overestimate their personal control over events. So which did the studies find? In a word: both.

{ Garden of the Mind | Continue reading }

Every day, the same, again

4523.jpgSleepwalking woman had sex with strangers

Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

Some women fake orgasms during sex in order to increase their own arousal, a new study has suggested.

The guy who created the iPhone’s Earth image explains why he needed to fake it

Kangaroos have three vaginas

Cholesterol levels vary by season, get worse in colder months

When adding is subtracting

Can you drive fast enough to avoid being clocked by speed cameras?

Had Finney invented Bitcoin himself and simply used his neighbor’s name as a pseudonym?

Nietzsche’s obituary, New York Times, August 26, 1900

A restaurant is now selling a drink topped with foie gras

PotCoin

Ceremonial action