Every day, the same, again

23.jpg New York Wants Google Maps to Discourage Left Turns

Left Turns Cause A Quarter Of All Pedestrian Crashes In U.S.

Coffee neither increases nor decreases the risk of developing lifestyle diseases such as obesity and diabetes, new research

Substance abuse reduces brain volume in women but not men

Since 2009, progress has been made in devising techniques for determining ideal male nipple positions

Facial Features: What Women Perceive as Attractive and What Men Consider Attractive

Cross-cultural study finds wide gap in what men and women want in a romantic partner

Research does show that if you increase people’s time awareness—by placing a big clock in front of them, for example—they do more stuff

Is your fear of radiation irrational?

Sharks living in a volcano

How to Sue Richard Prince and Win

Population density in NYC at day and night

Give me all of your bee syrup now

Donald Trump butt plug

‘now available in black: rainbows!’ —‏@lady_products

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“Water fountains have been disappearing from public spaces throughout the country over the last few decades,” lamented Nancy Stoner, an administrator in the Environmental Protection Agency’s water office. […]

By 1930, Chapelle says, bottled water had become “low class,” used only in offices and factories that couldn’t afford plumbing.

Attitudes began to shift in the 1970s, when Europe’s Perrier set its sights on the American market. In 1977, the company spent $5 million on an advertising campaign in New York, selling itself as a chic, upscale product. Yuppies lapped it up. “It was a lifestyle-defining product,” Chapelle says. By 1982, U.S. bottled-water consumption had doubled to 3.4 gallons per person per year. […]

U.S. consumption of bottled water quadrupled between 1993 and 2012 (reaching 9.67 billion gallons annually). […]

Today, 77 percent of Americans are concerned about pollution in their drinking water, according to Gallup, even though tap water and bottled water are treated the same way, and studies show that tap is as safe as bottled.

{ Washington Post | Continue reading }

art { Roy Lichtenstein, Girl in Water, 1965 }

A jink a jink a jawbo

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After the near‐collapse of the world’s financial system has shown that we economists really do not know how the world works, I am much too embarrassed to teach economics anymore, which I have done for many years. I will teach Modern Korean Drama instead.

Although I have never been to Korea, I have watched Korean drama on a daily basis for over six years now. Therefore I can justly consider myself an expert in that subject.

{ Uwe E. Reinhardt, Princeton University | PDF | via Chris Blattman }

photo { Ji Yeo | plastic surgery in South Korea }

Every day, the same, again

21.jpg A Researcher Made an Organic Computer Using Four Wired-Together Rat Brains

Scientists have discovered that living near trees is good for your health Related: Green and blue spaces promoted feelings of renewal, restoration, and spiritual connectedness

Text messaging during surgery provides analgesic-sparing benefits that surpass distraction techniques

How You Consist of Trillions of Tiny Machines

Stanford neuroscience research identifies more effective way to teach abstract math concepts to children

What It’s Like to Be Profoundly Face-Blind

Scientists showed domestic dogs avoid people they have seen behave unhelpfully to their owners

Swimming under the surface is faster than swimming on the surface. And the fish kick may be the fastest subsurface form yet.

Where does water go when it doesn’t flow?

Why do puddles stop spreading?

Global sea levels have risen six meters in the last three decades

Chinese Zoo Animals Monitored For Earthquake Prediction

It is forbidden to die in the Arctic town of Longyearbyen

Canadian lifted into sky in lawn chair by 100+ balloons, arrested upon landing

Every day, the same, again

3.jpgBraille tablet using a new liquid-based technology create tactile relief outputting braille, graphics and maps for the blind

A bizarre crime wave is sweeping one part of England - thieves are stripping down Vauxhall cars as their owners sleep

Smile at a party and people are more likely to remember seeing your face there

Key element of human language discovered in bird babble

New method reveals exact time of death after 10 days

This Is How Uber Takes Over a City

How Ads Follow You from Phone to Desktop to Tablet

The authors find no evidence of predictive ability from candlestick patterns alone, or in combination with other common technical indicators, like momentum.

The Physics Of Fireworks

Secrets of catching attention revealed. 1,072 ‘context words’ disclosed.

What happens to sardine prices when fishermen get mobile phones ?

Walmart Dress Code

Thursday: not a good day either for a mutton kidney at Buckley’s.

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Healthy people who were given the serotonin-boosting antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others, compared to those given a placebo. By contrast, those who were given a dose of the dopamine-enhancing Parkinson’s drug levodopa made more selfish decisions, overcoming an existing tendency to prefer harming themselves over others.

{ IB Times | Continue reading }

‘bathe in bat your eyelashes with dermatologist recommended water’ —@lady_products

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Research has shown that humans consciously use alcohol to encourage sexual activity. […]

In the current study, we examined if males exposed without their knowledge to pheromones emitted by fertile females would increase their alcohol consumption, presumably via neurobehavioral information pathways that link alcohol to sex and mating. We found that men who smelled a T-shirt worn by a fertile female drank significantly more (nonalcoholic) beer, and exhibited significantly greater approach behavior toward female cues, than those who smelled a T-shirt worn by a nonfertile female.

{ Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology | Continue reading }

photo { Miss August, 1957 }

‘I would sum up my fear about the future in one word: boring.’ —J.G. Ballard

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In a patent dispute between two pharmaceutical giants arguing over who owns the royalty rights to a lucrative wound-dressing solution, […] three judges coined a new legal definition of “one”. […]

The ConvaTec patent covered any salt solution “between 1 per cent and 25 per cent of the total volume of treatment”. However, Smith & Nephew devised a competing product that used 0.77 per cent concentration, bypassing, or so it believed, the ConvaTec patent. […]

Their lordships concluded that “one” includes anything greater or equal to 0.5 and less than 1.5  – much to the chagrin of Smith & Nephew.

{ The Independent | Continue reading }

the ends, the knees, the houghs of the knees

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[B]oth men and women show roughly the same neural activity during orgasm. […] “What we see is an overall activation of the brain; basically it’s like all systems go.”

This may explain why orgasms are so all-consuming – if the whole forest is blazing, it’s difficult to discriminate between the different campfires that were there at the start. “At orgasm, if everything gets activated simultaneously, this can obliterate the fine discrimination between activities,” Komisaruk adds. It is maybe why you can’t think about anything else. […]

The penis has just one route for carrying sensations to the brain, the female genital tract has three or four. […]

After orgasm, however, some important differences do emerge, which might begin to explain why men and women react so differently after climax. Komisaruk, with Kachina Allen, has found preliminary evidence that specific regions of the male brain become unresponsive to further sensory stimulation of the genitals in the immediate aftermath of orgasm, whereas women’s brains continue to be activated: this may be why some women experience multiple orgasms, and men do not.

{ BBC | Continue reading }

photos { Scott Tolmie | William Eggleston }

Every day, the same, again

2141.jpg 43% of married people don’t know how much money their spouse makes

Revealing the face of a criminal based on their genes may be closer than we think

Scientists build artificial neurons able to communicate with organic neurons

Brain connections last as long as the memories they store, Stanford neuroscientist finds

The hack is simple: if you are an average adult, a cup of coffee every 48 hours will do the trick.

Taking control remotely of modern cars has become distressingly easy for hackers

The pleasure of listening to music was not as great as he anticipated. He found more pleasure in manipulating music files.

Do observers like curvature or do they dislike angularity? [PDF]

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

How to steal an election

A hand from the cloud emerges, holding a chart expanded

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In the course of several studies, 22 male and female subjects, ranging in age from 5–75 years, have been stimulated while asleep by simulated sonic booms […] and subsonic jet flyover noise. […]

Children (5–8 years of age) are uniformly unaffected by noise during sleep;

older subjects are more sensitive to noise than younger subjects;

women are more sensitive to noise during sleep than are men.

{ Journal of Sound and Vibration | Continue reading }

oil on canvas { Hilo Chen, Beach 163, 2009 }

Gradual decline into order

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The first portable audio recorder was made in 1945 by a man named Tony Schwartz. […]

Armed with his recorder (and sometimes a secret microphone attached to his wrist), Schwartz chronicled every sound in his Manhattan neighborhood.  He recorded children singing songs in the park, street festival music, jukeboxes in restaurants, vendors peddling vegetables, and more than 700 conversations with cab drivers. […]

He released 14 records of his sound collections, including a whole record of the sounds of sewing, and had a free-range weekly radio program on WNYC for more than 35 years. […]

As insatiably curious as he was, Tony Schwartz didn’t travel. He was severely agoraphobic. […]

Eventually Schwartz amassed a huge collection of more than fifteen thousand recordings of conversation, folklore, and folk music, which he then shared with his listeners. He introduced Harry Belafonte to Jamaican music, gave African music to the Weavers, and created a global sound exchange, all from within the few blocks he felt comfortable traveling.

{ 99% Invisible | Continue reading | Thanks Tim }

skateboard deck { Kronk }